Wednesday, May 6, 2009

Senate Expands FDIC Credit Line To $100 Billion

As had been widely expected, today (a day before the stress test results finally stop leaking, compliments of the securities and exchange commission) the senate passed a measure approving the expansion of the credit line from the Treasury to the FDIC to $100 billion, from $30 billion previously. The vote passed 91 to 5. In addition, the FDIC will now have half a trillion credit limit that will expire by the end of 2010. As the senate has firmly decided that dollars are now not worth even their weight in zero-ply toilet paper, it makes sense to see just how quickly the FDIC has managed to eat through the Deposit Insurance Fund, of which it had roughly $19 billion at the end of 2008, and now has a couple of pennies above zero, which any way one looks at it is less than the statutory DIF reserve minimum of 1.15% of insured deposits (indicatively, the minimum balance in the DIF (at least according to existing laws: once can imagine these will be promptly "adjusted") should be $54 billion, or 1.15% of the $4.7 trillion in insured deposits. Once it falls below that amount the FDIC must come up with a restoration plan to raise the DIF to that level. Good luck with that) .

And all this was accomplished in a mere four months.

Oh, and by the way, advisor for the FDIC, in case you missed it before, is Perella Weinberg
(here is the link for the ongoing Zero Hedge FDIC-Perella Weinberg compensation FOIA initiative).

hat tip Guillermo Sphere: Related Content
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